good in every day

EverydayWhen days were lonely and long during my time at Dallas Theological Seminary, I remember sitting in my room and starting a list of "things I want to do" and "things I want to learn". The list was pretty long, but it soon became my go to method for pulling myself out of the doldrums.

This "good in every day" game is similar. I sometimes think about it when I am making an entry in my written journal - the one I keep of things not fit for print - and pretty soon I have more than enough thoughts to be jotted down. It's worth the time to do if for no other reason that to see value in every day.


persistence

Patience is drawing on underlying forces; it is powerfully positive, though to a natural view it looks just sitting it out. How would I persist against positive eroding forces if I were not drawing on invisible forces? And patience has a positive tonic effect on others; because of the presence of the patient person, they revive and go on, as if he were the gyroscope of the ship providing stable ground. But the patient person himself does not enjoy it.  -- Paul Goodman


the bottom line

The other day I viewed part of a pastor’s message which encouraged believers to be responsible for their spiritual health. He was concerned that believers were being too reliant on their weekly visit to their local church and then blaming the church for not feeding them spiritually. He reminded his listeners that if they were not being satisfied in their spiritual lives, then maybe that was simply the result of their not taking personal responsibility for times of spiritual nourishment the other six days of the week.

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you know

BlahNot only is the use of "So..." irritating to my ears in the course of conversation; the use of "...you know..." is almost as distracting.

It's found in conversations where someone is trying to explain something and they pepper the explanation with "...you know...". It seems to happen when their mouth gets ahead of their brain. They seem like they don't want to wait for their brain to catch up so they just insert a "you know" to get from one point to another.

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as if no one knows

TBTIt used to bother me...

People going through grief saying they think no one knows what they're going through.

It's not that I think people shouldn't grieve.  They most certainly should, and do. But why assume that the condition of grief is constant? Why think that things will never change? When grief is fresh, it's the same as having an ever-present paper cut or a bruise that doesn't seem to heal.

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