northmen ethics

I have long been intrigued by those who live off the land ("off the grid" as it's now called) - pioneers who for the most part were self-reliant.

I think it was the words of Henry David Thoreau which first set in my mind the challenge of such a life:

"I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.”

And then there was that day I went to see the movie "My Side of the Mountain" based on the book by Jean Craighead George.

There was something that appealed to me about living alone. There is a sense of life being lived differently, with greater awareness.

Some of that awareness seems to be echoed in the Northmen's Code of Ethics.  Lots to ponder here...

I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/h/henrydavid107665.html

 


numinous

Moon"The moon is a stone; but it is a highly numinous stone. Or, to be more precise, it is a stone about which and because of which men and women have numinous feelings. Thus, there is a soft moonlight that can give us the peace that passes understanding. There is a moonlight that inspires a kind of awe. There is a cold and austere moonlight that tells the soul of its loneliness and desperate isolation, its insignificance or its uncleanness. There is an amorous moonlight prompting to love — to love not only for an individual but sometimes even for the whole universe."

 

-Aldous Huxley

(from the book Music At Night and other essays)

 

 

 
 
nu·mi·nous /ˈn(y)o͞omənəs/ adjective
; having a strong religious or spiritual quality; indicating or suggesting the presence of a divinity.

being a child...at 60

Carousel2“Critics who treat ‘adult’ as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.”


— C.S. Lewis