northmen ethics

I have long been intrigued by those who live off the land ("off the grid" as it's now called) - pioneers who for the most part were self-reliant.

I think it was the words of Henry David Thoreau which first set in my mind the challenge of such a life:

"I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.”

And then there was that day I went to see the movie "My Side of the Mountain" based on the book by Jean Craighead George.

There was something that appealed to me about living alone. There is a sense of life being lived differently, with greater awareness.

Some of that awareness seems to be echoed in the Northmen's Code of Ethics.  Lots to ponder here...

I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/h/henrydavid107665.html

 


Whoo hooo! It's Friday

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And it's the end of another week! Party with The Batman Lego Movie -- It's fun and awesome!

Update: I caught the movie at my favorite movie theater - The Alamo in Winchester.   I think it's every bit as good as "The Lego Movie" and the message about doing things as part of a team is well done. 

Even though the Alamo is my favorite theater, they have recently switched to all reserved seating - which now means that you can't just walk into the theater and sit down. No, now you could pick your seat and end up having someone siting next to you even though you might have selected one that was fairly free of other people at the time of ticket purchase. (Granted, it could end up like that anyway if the movie is popular and new and the theater gets sold out. But that happens after having purchased a ticket and you sit in a fairly unoccupied area of the theater. I know, I'm nuts, but I like my space.) So unless you're willing to purchase an extra seat to give you some space between yourself and whoever shows up beside you, you'll find yourself being invaded by whoever picks the seat beside you.  For me, that meant some guy in a long trench coat and a cowboy hat who was an open mouth eater. And beside him was a group of two men, two anklebiters, and a woman; the men were drinking Corona beers and ignoring their noisy children (one boy was constantly saying "Batman wouldn't do that...") and a mother who appeared as though she had checked out once the lights were lowered and the movie began.  So I'm guessing I'm going to have to look for another theater -- or just wait for the movie to appear on pay per view and watch it at home. 


"there is no try"

One of the cable TV channels has been broadcasting all six episodes of the Star Wars saga. It has been fun watching these movies in order.  I had to laugh when Episode 2 was shown and remembered that after the second time seeing the movie I thought it was one of the worst movie stories of the entire series.  The special effects were great, but the story and the acting -- simply awful.

Then, this afternoon, I tuned in Episode 5, The Empire Strikes Back. This was the movie that made sure that the third movie in the first trilogy would have to be made simply to answer all of the story questions raised.  But it was also the movie that, at the time, was one of the most powerful movie scenes about faith I had seen at that point in life.

As I watched the scene again, I was convinced that this is the scene which is my favorite in the entire movie series so far.  I have parts of "The Clone Wars" animated series that I think are wonderful, but this one is my favorite: