for the birds

BlackbirdwhiteI have to admit that I’ve allowed some of my property to become overgrown.

Some of it is due to wanting to feel secluded. A family to the south of me and an older couple to the west of me are beyond trees and bushes.  The obnoxious building supply store to the north of me is blocked by the barrier of thuja giant evergreen trees I planted years ago. The east is open – well, fairly open; it’s sometimes blocked by railroad cars on the tracks east of the house.  Two tall evergreen trees and an adolescent maple tree give me some blockage.

But, another reason for the overgrowth comes from a love of birds.

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a turkey, an old building, and an answer to prayer (part 2)

TurkeyI was coming home from plant shopping with my sister on Mother’s Day when I noticed people walking into my property as I was driving toward the house.  I was about a half mile away from the property, so I couldn’t see who it was.  Initial thoughts were that I had caught someone trying to hop the fence into the backyard.

When I pulled up to my property and tried to see who was invading my space, I had to laugh. It was my neighbor’s daughter Brooke, her husband Kyle, and their son Ryder.  I rolled down the window and said hello. 

“We were just looking into your back yard.  A wild turkey just flew into it,” Brooke said.  We started laughing and joking about the whole thing.  I pulled around the house into the driveway and decided to begin the search for the turkey.

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a turkey, an old building, and an answer to prayer (part 1)

Shed2It was one of the last things my dad did – or was able to do – before cancer weakened him and then took his life.

The saga of the garden shed is a story in itself. First there was a metal shed with sliding doors that dad and my granddad assembled – only they didn’t quiet follow instructions and it was about a foot shorter in width than it should have been. Dad never said much about it after it was built; the “short shed” was always a reminder to “read the instructions” from that point on.

It got old, and rusty, and dad had to tear it down in order to make way for the two-car garage he was having built.  So after the garage was built, he had one of those Amish outbuildings brought onto the property to hold garden tools and other stuff.  It had two windows, hunter green shutters, and two front doors closed at the center and trimmed in the same hunter green. 

And then, he died.

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