funeral planning (11/27/2017 - planned)

Funeral1Sis and I had breakfast the other morning, and I was surprised when she mentioned she had visited a local funeral home and had made arrangements for her own funeral.

Every week as I drove to the First Church of Panera, I kept noticing a billboard for the funeral home and it's reminder that now is the time to start making "final arrangements".

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the bend in the road

Bend

"Death is not the end of the road; it is only a bend in the road. The road winds only through those paths through which Christ Himself has gone. This Travel Agent does not expect us to discover the trail for ourselves. Often we say that Christ will meet us on the other side. That is true, of course, but misleading. Let us never forget that He walks with us on this side of the curtain and then guides us through the opening. We will meet Him there, because we have met Him here. The tomb is not an entrance to death, but to life. The sepulcher is not an empty vault, but the doorway to heaven. When we die, nothing in God dies, and His faithfulness endures. Little wonder the pagans said of the early church that they carried their dead as if in triumph!"

Lutzer, Erwin W. (2015-04-17). One Minute After You Die (p. 78). Moody Publishers. Kindle Edition.


bagpipes in heaven

I don't know what it is, but one hymn should always be played using bagpipes.

I remember that in 1972, a version of the traditional hymn was recorded by the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards. It reached the US pop music charts and during that year you could hear the sound of "Amazing Grace" played on the bagpipes almost anywhere there was a radio.

As the bagpipe version of the hymn became more popular, it came to be associated with funerals, particularly when the fallen being remembered were members of the military or public servants.

It was even played at Spock's funeral in The Wrath of Khan in 1982 by none other than Chief Engineer Montgomery Scott.

And so here's that same arrangement as the one I remember becoming popular in 1972 -- and it has that "it gets me every time" moment when the solo explodes into the full band version. It's the type of thing that I've asked God to include when we all get to heaven.