the lonely Christian

Lonely

"The loneliness of the Christian results from his walk with God in an ungodly world, a walk that must often take him away from the fellowship of good Christians as well as from that of the unregenerate world. His God-given instincts cry out for companionship with others of his kind, others who can understand his longings, his aspirations, his absorption in the love of Christ; and because within his circle of friends there are so few who share his inner experiences he is forced to walk alone.

The unsatisfied longings of the prophets for human understanding caused them to cry out in their complaint, and even our Lord Himself suffered in the same way.

The man who has passed on into the divine Presence in actual inner experience will not find many who understand him. He finds few who care to talk about that which is the supreme object of his interest, so he is often silent and preoccupied in the midst of noisy religious shoptalk. For this he earns the reputation of being dull and over-serious, so he is avoided and the gulf between him and society widens.

He searches for friends upon whose garments he can detect the smell of myrrh and aloes and cassia out of the ivory palaces, and finding few or none he, like Mary of old, keeps these things in his heart.

It is this very loneliness that throws him back upon God. His inability to find human companionship drives him to seek in God what he can find nowhere else."


—A. W. Tozer


numinous

Moon"The moon is a stone; but it is a highly numinous stone. Or, to be more precise, it is a stone about which and because of which men and women have numinous feelings. Thus, there is a soft moonlight that can give us the peace that passes understanding. There is a moonlight that inspires a kind of awe. There is a cold and austere moonlight that tells the soul of its loneliness and desperate isolation, its insignificance or its uncleanness. There is an amorous moonlight prompting to love — to love not only for an individual but sometimes even for the whole universe."

 

-Aldous Huxley

(from the book Music At Night and other essays)

 

 

 
 
nu·mi·nous /ˈn(y)o͞omənəs/ adjective
; having a strong religious or spiritual quality; indicating or suggesting the presence of a divinity.

the warlord's companion

Cover1Yes, it's finally in print!

Just over 10 years ago, I was taking a break and read a few headlines from an internet news provider. One story described how archeologists had found a mummified panda in someone's tomb. The person being interviewed described the find and then commented that they felt the panda would be used for food in the afterlife.

I remember sitting back in my chair and thinking, "What if...?" What if the panda was not food? What if the panda was actually a pet?

Continue reading "the warlord's companion" »


uphill

Uphill

Does the road wind up-hill all the way?
    Yes, to the very end.
Will the day's journey take the whole long day?
    From morn to night, my friend.

But is there for the night a resting-place?
    A roof for when the slow dark hours begin.
May not the darkness hide it from my face?
    You cannot miss that inn.

Shall I meet other wayfarers at night?
   Those who have gone before.
Then must I knock, or call when just in sight?
   They will not keep you standing at that door.

Shall I find comfort, travel-sore and weak?
   Of labour you shall find the sum.
Will there be beds for me and all who seek?
   Yea, beds for all who come.

- Christina Rosetti


effective

I read Stephen Covey's book back in the late 90's. It's one of those books that has stayed with me long after reading it and to which I find myself constantly reviewing and reminding myself of its lessons. Recently I stumbled over a video that summarizes the contents of Covey's book. It was a good refresher. It's more of a visual book report, but it's still good.

 


"...He has infinity to listen..."

SilentplantMy first exposure to C. S. Lewis was through his classic science fiction tale, Out of the Silent Planet. I read it my sophomore year at Washington Bible College when my dormitory room was on the northeast side of the building facing some pine trees and the road which rounded down the hill from the main entrance of the college. I still remember those hours when I would sit back in the desk chair and rest my feet on the desk and read Lewis' story about a man from Earth ("the silent planet") to the planet Malacandria. The book is rich in description and the experience of reading it has stayed with me for many years.

And he is the author of the Narnia books as well as many other books on theological ideas. I loved reading him.

As I wandered around the internet I found an old interview he gave to the BBC that is related to his book "Mere Christianity".  It features Lewis' gift of being able to explain theological concepts using everyday examples. I especially love his explanation of the eternal nature of God to our finite existence:  "... [God] has infinity in which to listen to the split second of prayer..."