legacy

Legacy

“Yet man dies not whilst the world, at once his mother and his monument, remains. His name is lost, indeed, but the breath he breathed still stirs the pine-tops on the mountains, the sound of the words he spoke yet echoes on through space; the thoughts his brain gave birth to we have inherited to-day; his passions are our cause of life; the joys and sorrows that he knew are our familiar friends—the end from which he fled aghast will surely overtake us also!

"Truly the universe is full of ghosts, not sheeted churchyard spectres, but the inextinguishable elements of individual life, which having once been, can never die, though they blend and change, and change again forever.”

-H. Rider Haggard, King Solomon’s Mines


Christ's beauty

GreenKalei

“Many of His saints looked upon Him from the gloom of dungeons and from the martyr's flames; yet they never uttered an ill word of Him, but died extolling His surpassing charms. To keep our gaze on the Lord Jesus is noble and pleasant employment. Is it not unspeakably delightful to view the Savior in all His works and to perceive Him matchless in each? To shift the kaleidoscope, as it were, and to find fresh combinations of matchless grace? In the manger and in eternity, on the cross and on His throne, in the garden and in His kingdom, among thieves or in the midst of cherubim, He is everywhere glorious in His beauty.

“Examine carefully every little act of His life and every trait of His character, and He is as lovely in the minute as in the majestic. Judge Him as you will, you cannot censure; weigh Him as you please, and He will not be found wanting. Eternity shall not discover the shadow of a spot in our Beloved, but rather as ages revolve, His hidden glories will shine with even more inconceivable splendor, and His unutterable loveliness will continually ravish all celestial minds."

Devotional material is taken from “Morning and Evening,” written by C.H. Spurgeon, revised and updated by Alistair Begg. Copyright (c) 2003, Good News Publishers and used by Truth For Life with written permission.


TBT - My First Novel

TBTOne whole year...

It's hard to believe but my first novel was self-published on March 1, 2017. 

Cause for celebration? For me it is. Regrets? Not one.

I wander by the Amazon page and I still smile --- and I find myself laughing, too.

BenStats

Stephen King or J. K Rowling can sleep sweetly. I will never be a threat to them. A joke, maybe, but never a threat. (Bill smiles widely.)

But I still take a great deal of pride in my achievement. I wrote about how the novel came about when the book was released on Amazon last year.

Cover1And now - I'm working on the second of four stories that I have planned with Benjamin Sunday. It's still tough, and I still get discouraged at times, but I keep working at it. I get a good idea and try and figure out where it fits in the total arc of the book.  I reread some of what I've written and think, "C'mon, Bill - who are you trying to kid...?" Still, the fun is in the journey and I keep telling myself, "Hey, you did one. You can do another."

I'm hoping to self-publish "Benjamin Sunday and the Mayan's Secret" later this year. It precedes the first novel and shares the exciting adventure Benjamin has with his mentor, Dr. Jackson Reynolds.

This one will be more fantasy than the first novel. I have been visited by the imagination muse and much of what seems to be invading the book is unbelievable - but I'm trying hard to take the fantasy and write in such a way that I can say, "It could happen..."

So here's to hoping that Novel 1 has a brother this time next year. Finger's crossed...


three lessons

There are three lessons I would write, Heart
Three words, as with a burning pen,
In tracings of eternal light,
Upon the hearts of men.

Have Hope. Though clouds environ round,
And gladness hides her face in scorn,
Put off the shadow from thy brow:
No night but hath its morn.

Have Faith. Where'er thy bark is driven -
The calm's disport, the tempest's mirth -
Know this: God rules the hosts of heaven,
The inhabitants of earth.

Have Love. Not love alone for one,
But man, as man, thy brother call;
And scatter, like a circling sun,
Thy charities on all.

-Frederich von Schiller


cure for the hurrying and the bustling

RockingLet me counsel every true servant of Christ to “examine his own heart” frequently and carefully as to his state before God. This is a practice which is useful at all times: it is especially desirable at the present day.  When the great plague of London was at its height people [noticed] the least symptoms that appeared on their bodies in a way that they never remarked them before. A spot here, or a spot there, which in time of health men thought nothing of, received close attention when the plague was decimating families, and striking down one after another! So it ought to be with ourselves, in the times in which we live. We ought to watch our hearts with double watchfulness. We ought to give more time to meditation, self-examination, and reflection. It is a hurrying, bustling age: if we would be kept from falling, we must make time for being frequently alone with God.

J. C. Ryle (1816-1900)


too busy...

I recently read this very interesting and entertaining article by Jason Zook -- about being too busy. He's very convicting, but in a good way.

________________

I’ve never heard of a highly creative or successful person being too busy.

Let me rephrase that: I’ve never heard of a highly creative or successful person that I respect being too busy. The most creative people of our time are doing more things in a day than most people do in a week (or even month). But you know what you rarely hear a highly creative or successful person say? “I’m too busy.”

Continue reading "too busy..." »


posted!

FbI got posted online!  NOTE: This is a follow-up to my blog post of December 9, 2017.

While scrolling my Facebook timeline, an article link caught my eye from one of the groups I follow. It was an article about single women and how they could enjoy the Christmas holiday. It was a good article with some great suggestions, but the nagging question I had after reading it was, "What about single men?"

Continue reading "posted!" »


brother, can you spare an idea?

All of us, to some extent, borrow from others, from the culture around us. Ideas are in the air, and we may appropriate, often without realizing, the phrases and language of the times. We borrow language itself; we did not invent it. We found it, we grew up into it, though we may use it, interpret it, in very individual ways. What is at issue is not the fact of “borrowing” or “imitating,” of being “derivative,” being “influenced,” but what one does with what is borrowed or imitated or derived; how deeply one assimilates it, takes it into oneself, compounds it with one’s own experiences and thoughts and feelings, places it in relation to oneself, and expresses it in a new way, one’s own.

-- Oliver Sacks, The River of Conciousness


the bend in the road

Bend

"Death is not the end of the road; it is only a bend in the road. The road winds only through those paths through which Christ Himself has gone. This Travel Agent does not expect us to discover the trail for ourselves. Often we say that Christ will meet us on the other side. That is true, of course, but misleading. Let us never forget that He walks with us on this side of the curtain and then guides us through the opening. We will meet Him there, because we have met Him here. The tomb is not an entrance to death, but to life. The sepulcher is not an empty vault, but the doorway to heaven. When we die, nothing in God dies, and His faithfulness endures. Little wonder the pagans said of the early church that they carried their dead as if in triumph!"

Lutzer, Erwin W. (2015-04-17). One Minute After You Die (p. 78). Moody Publishers. Kindle Edition.